Currently showing: Other

20 Feb 18 18:14

In today's world we often have a fixed perception on the way the world works. These perceptions are usually built on one-off experiences or biases passed on from those around us. College students are loud and obnoxious, the Department for Motor Vehicles is a horrible place, and insurance companies are out to get you (and your money). People often ask themselves the following question: why am I legally required to have car insurance and why am I paying into something that I will never use? I'll admit, I used to be one of these people. I was raised in a family of good drivers who were never involved in any kind of accidents and who never had anything happen to their vehicles. So why do we pay hundreds- sometimes thousands of dollars for something we'll probably never use? It wasn't until I began my studies at St. John's University into Risk Management & Insurance that I began to see how misconstrued my perception of insurance really was.

I'm sure no one ever wakes up and says they're going to make a career out of a position in the insurance industry; well neither did I. It started off with my high school guidance counselor telling me I have an analytic prowess and interest that would take me far as a risk manager. Of course I didn't believe him and wanting to take the path of least resistance I just went with it. Once I started taking my insurance classes at St. John's I began to build an understanding of what insurance actually is and why it is so important. After all, the concept of insurance has been around for almost 300 years. I'll never forget one of the biggest revelations I had one day in class. My professor simply said that we are not selling insurance- we're offering peace of mind. As farfetched or scripted as that may sound, it's actually the truth. Insurance is one of those things that you never need until you do- only then do you appreciate the value of it. There are many rewarding things I can talk about having worked on here at Swiss Re for going on two years, but this change in perspective has left an impact on my life that I now take with me everywhere. My career here isn’t meaningless; though I may not work in small personal lines where I can put a face to every transaction I deal with I can still say that the businesses I deal with have the potential to benefit from the work I do.

Never could I have imagined I'd be in the position I am today six years ago when I was leaving high school. My journey through Swiss Re has led me to new adventures, new inspirations similar to that of the one I had that day in the classroom. Before Swiss Re I had never left the United States other than to go to my parents' home country in South America. Last year I visited Switzerland four times for work-related events. I've gone to Oktoberfest in Munich, seen the crystal clear lake at the center of Como, visited the Duomo in Milan, and even snowboarded in the Alps; all the while carrying with me a new perspective on life. One that has kept me open to the endless possibilities that life has to offer- not limiting myself to my preconceived notions.

This month is insurance careers month and people like myself are asked to give their honest feedback about their experiences working in insurance. I am in every way possible a very normal person experiencing extraordinary things because of the work I do. The insurance industry is currently craving new young talent. There is a massive age gap in the industry meaning that in the next 30 years a majority of the people working in the industry will have retired. This means that there is ample opportunity for the next generation to build their own experiences around their careers. Travelling is just one aspect that I've explored this far into my still very young career. Working in insurance has been a truly rewarding experience thus far and I'm confident enough to say I now have friends all over the world- with different experiences, different perspectives, and so much to say on how the world works.

Category: Other

Location: Armonk, NY, USA


If you would like to leave a comment, please, log in.